NewsHans' BiographyTeam (Present & Past)DiscographyMediaArchivesJukeboxFan CoversAbout/Feedback
 SEARCH
 

 FAN COMMENTS
Fleming doesn't seem to have done much, and both Dave and Vorlander are credited on the Simulation Pt I.After digging through ASCAP a bit, I found Dave Fleming's and Vorlander's credits on this so here's what I found: <br><br>David Fleming:<br>1M01 Opening (this is a guess as there he is credited on a cue just named Divergent)<br>3M24 Grab the Rail<br>4M30 Weapon of Choice<br>5M56a Simulation of Four's Fears, Part I<br><br>Christian Vorländer:<br>1M03 Lining up for the Test<br>1M04 Simulation<br>2M08 Jumping from the Train<br>3M16 Training Begins<br>3M17 Tris Sees Tori<br>3M26 Knife Throwing<br>3M27 Jeanine at Dauntless<br>4M28 Tris vs. Peter<br>4M30 Weapon of Choice<br>4M31 Climbing the Ferris Wheel<br>4M32 Capture the Flag<br>4M38 Simulation / Crow Attack<br>5M42 Simulation / Trapped Water<br>5M49 Tris Attacked / Four Saves Tris<br>5M56a Simulation of Four's Fears, Part I<br>6M63 Zombies<br>Tris Takes the Final Sim TestThis album is the best!! I Love the movie and the music makes it.Does anyone know about the live performance of Fallout ?That makes perfect sense and I fully agree with you :p
Science & Religion on the OST is comprised of 4m25a Black Tongue part A and 6m38 God Save Us. Hope this helps!I was never extremely gung ho about any of the films, but I do agree that there feels like a bit of charm was missing from this one. Especially in the tidy way everything wrapped up. I also found the villain to be extremely forgettable, basically a lesser version of Drago. But hey, at least the visuals were great.<br><br>And I do partially agree on the score, although I think it is hard to give a fair opinion until the music has actually been released. But while HTTYD1 has all of the best highlights and HTTYD2 (my personal favorite) has the best narrative development, I feel like this one works as a solid score on it’s own. The weakest of the three but still a pretty good score, if that makes sense.Can someone please tell me which parts make Science & Religion and the rest of the Original Soundtrack release?I have to say I'm a little bit disappointed, movie wise and score wise. Although it's a very good score, it seems like all the highlights are when old themes come back. I'll definitely have to check it on album to see if this impression holds up, maybe it's only because I'm overly familiar with those themes, and new ones still have to grow on me (like with litterally every Powell release).<br><br>As for the movie, it felt like the charm and beautiful story of #1 have partly been replaced by poor jokes and loads of explosive action. There are moving moments here and there, but overall it left me quite cold.Assuming McQ changing up the crew for newer installments applies to the composers too, I'd certainly like to see someone else take the mantle. Would be interesting to see David Arnold tackle a different sort of spy film, or John Ottman taking a stab at it.<br><br>Though if anyone were to return, it'll likely be Balfe, just from all the buzz Fallout got. Would love to see Kraemer again, but the supposed BTS issues make that unlikely.
You seriously mean to tell me "Light The Fuse" isn't fun or creative in the slightest? Probably is my favorite rendition of theme regarding just the films. III was certainly dull, but GP proved Gia had a voice for the series.<br><br>Balfe does do some cool things with The Plot, but I fail to see how his renditions of the main theme add anything new. Even the epic choir gets mostly dialed out in the final film. They're perfectly solid, but nothing that I'd say is great.I don't know if it's just me but the music doesn't sound as amazing to me like it did for HTTYD 1 & 2, granted i've only listened to the previews but i did the same for 1 & 2 and it got me hyped. I hope I'm wrongSo having seen the film I can say that this is tonally the most mature score of the series. The old themes all get their moment to shine, but surprisingly are used far less than the previous 2. There also seem to be some temped moments, with one scene using portions of “Battle of the Bewilderbeast” and so on. It will be interesting to see what is missing from the album.<br><br>In terms of new stuff, both “The Hidden World” cue and the “Fury Love Theme” are obviously the standouts. Especially in the way they develop throughout. And without spoiling anything, there are some beautiful choral moments in the last 15 minutes. As for the villain material, there wasn’t really anything distinctive that I picked up, which might change with a few listens.As everyone has said for the billionth time, NO. These are all unofficial fan-made edits or rips.Is this cd of the complete score available for purchase somewhere?
I loved it a lot like you and was searching and searching with no result for a long time.... and know what? Did not forget about it UNTIL NOW!!! It was in a change room at my fitness studio when I heard a very faint sound and was tunderstruck!!! The melody I was looking for for so long!!! And Shazam helped me out: it is a song from the christians from 1995 or so, called: Words! You‘re welcome :-)))and tracklist<br><br>Pictures. Visit the official movie website for more information.<br><br>Here’s the album track list:<br><br><br> <br>1. Serenity<br>2. The Beast<br>3. Suit<br>4. Karen<br>5. Baker Dill<br>6. Patrick<br>7. Memory<br>8. Deliver Me From Temptation<br>9. He Wants Justice<br>10. Girl at the Bridge<br>11. I Am the Rules<br>12. Plymouth Island<br>13. I Remember You<br>14. Catch That Fish<br>15. How We See It<br>16. Creator<br>17. Justice<br>18. Alternate Reality<br>19. It’s Dad<br><br>Saying Balfe has no imagination is beyond stupid. Take a listen at some of his work on animated movies (Home, or his work on KFP2-3), it's definitely not to work of someone without imagination.<br><br>On Fallout in particular, I honestly think he makes the best use of the classic themes in the series. That's maybe not "imaginative", as these themes aren't his, but it's definitely clever and not something every composer can do. Even an experienced guy like Michael Giacchino had 2 stabs at this franchise, and yet failed not only to give a memorable score, but also failed in using these classic themes in such a fun way.JohnWilliams Started out or rather got more into the realm of composing being doing Tv SHowsMeistermind - what’s wrong with being a TV composer ?<br><br>You sound like those idiots on Film music forum that think they know so much .The keyboard comment is exactly the nonsense said.<br><br>Fallout is one of the best action films ever in my opinion with a brilliant soundtrack.<br><br>
Latest

Please install Flash®
and turn on Javascript.


Rate those CD:
Top 50







Mini biography from IMDB

German-born composer Hans Zimmer is recognized as one of Hollywood’s most innovative musical talents‚ having first enjoyed success in the world of pop music as a member of The Buggles. The group’s single Video Killed the Radio Star became a worldwide hit and helped usher in a new era of global entertainment as the first music video to be aired on MTV.

Zimmer entered the world of film music in London during a long collaboration with famed composer and mentor Stanley Myers‚ which included the film My Beautiful Laundrette. He soon began work on several successful solo projects‚ including the critically acclaimed A World Apart‚ and during these years Zimmer pioneered the use of combining old and new musical technologies. Today‚ this work has earned him the reputation of being the father of integrating the electronic musical world with traditional orchestral arrangements.

A turning point in Zimmer’s career came in 1988 when he was asked to score Rain Man for director Barry Levinson. The film went on to win the Oscar for Best Picture of the Year and earned Zimmer his first Academy Award Nomination for Best Original Score. The next year‚ Zimmer composed the score for another Best Picture Oscar recipient‚ Driving Miss Daisy‚ starring Jessica Tandy and Morgan Freeman.

Having already scored two Best Picture winners‚ in the early ’90s Zimmer cemented his position as a pre-eminent talent with the award-winning score for The Lion King. The soundtrack has sold over 15 million copies to date and earned him an Academy Award for Best Original Score‚ a Golden Globe‚ an American Music Award‚ a Tony and two Grammy Awards. In total‚ Zimmer’s work has been nominated for 7 Golden Globes‚ 7 Grammys and seven Oscars for “Rainman”‚ “Gladiator”‚ “The Lion King”‚ “As good As It Gets”‚ “The Preachers Wife”‚ “The Thin Red Line‚” “The Prince Of Egypt” and “The Last Samurai.”

With his career in full swing‚ Zimmer was anxious to replicate the mentoring experience he had benefited from under Stanley Myers’ guidance. With state-of-the-art technology and a supportive creative environment‚ Zimmer was able to offer film-scoring opportunities to young composers at his Santa Monica-based musical ’think tank.’ This approach helped launch the careers of such notable composers as Mark Mancina‚ John Powell‚ Harry Gregson-Williams‚ Nick Glennie-Smith and Klaus Badelt.

In 2000 Zimmer scored the music for Gladiator‚ for which he received an Oscar nomination‚ in addition to Golden Globe and Broadcast Film Critics Awards for his epic score. It sold more than three million copies worldwide and spawned a second album “Gladiator: More Music From The Motion Picture‚” released on the Universal Classics/Decca label. Zimmer’s other scores that year included Mission: Impossible 2‚ The Road To El Dorado and An Everlasting Piece‚ directed by Barry Levinson.

Some of his other impressive scores include Pearl Harbor‚ The Ring‚4 films directed by Ridley Scott; Matchstick Men‚ Hannibal‚ Black Hawk Down and Thelma & Louise‚ Penny Marshall’s Riding In Cars With Boys and A League Of Their Own‚ Quentin Tarantino’s True Romance‚ Tears Of The Sun‚ Ron Howard’s Backdraft‚ Days Of Thunder‚ Smilla’s Sense Of Snow and the animated Spirit: Stallion Of The Cimarron for which he also co-wrote four of the songs with Bryan Adams‚ including the Golden Globe nominated “Here I Am.”

At the 27th annual Flanders International Film Festival‚ Zimmer performed live for the first time in concert with a 100-piece orchestra and a 100-piece choir. Choosing selections from his impressive body of work‚ Zimmer performed newly orchestrated concert versions of Gladiator‚ Mission: Impossible 2‚ Rain Man‚ The Lion King‚ and The Thin Red Line. The concert was recorded by Decca and released as a concert album entitled "The Wings Of A Film: The Music Of Hans Zimmer."

In 2003‚ Zimmer completed his 100th film score for the film The Last Samurai‚ starring Tom Cruise‚ for which he received both a Golden Globe and a Broadcast Film Critics nomination. Over the past year‚ Zimmer has scored Nancy Meyers’ comedy Something’s Gotta Give‚ the animated Dreamworks film‚ A Shark’s Tale (featuring voices of Will Smith‚ Renee Zellweger‚ Robert De Niro‚ Jack Black and Martin Scorsese)‚ and most recently‚ Jim Brooks’ Spanglish starring Adam Sandler and Tea Leoni (for which he also received a Golden Globe nomination). His upcoming projects include Paramount’s Weatherman starring Nicolas Cage‚ Dreamworks’ Madagascar and highly anticipated Warner Bros. summer release‚ Batman Begins.

Zimmer’s additional honors and awards include the prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award in Film Composition from the National Board of Review‚ and the Frederick Loewe Award in 2003 at the Palm Springs International Film Festival. He has also received ASCAP’s Henry Mancini Award for Lifetime Achievement. Hans and his wife live in Los Angeles and he is the father of 4.


 HANS-ZIMMER.com© 2001-2018 OST