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Heard Hans Zimmer at Merriweather Post Pavilion. What a mind bowing performance.Hey Hybrid,<br><br>Will they ever release the track they pieced together for the 7 Minute IMAX Preview/Prologue?just commented on the WaterTower Music yt channel. (i waited a day lol!) <br><br>Hans and his team made me the best birthday present ever : )<br><br>i like seeing the "few notes" principle Hans explained in his Masterclass. this score takes it to a master high level.<br><br>i would like to say in passing that the experiment on Inferno  (ambient music) can be felt through this score. and i love it!<br><br>thanks Hans, Lorne, Andrew, Benjamin, and anyone involved. thanks Hybrid Soldier, your fan website is the best!The rendition of What Are You Going To Do When You're Not Saving The World in the new Justice League trailer is pretty cool, at least it shows they have not forgotten this theme :-pMy one hope is that this doesn't mean Chris Nolan will be tying Zimmer's hands behind his back for future scores. If he wants to do that here, okay. I can get over one score. But I hope Nolan doesn't keep calling for this non-melodic approach.
That was one of my favorites, wish it was on the OST.Yeah, was also looking for that track.Nolan's liner notes, which explains a lot on the score :<br><br>"British people are raised on the story of Dunkirk. The events of the evacuation are sacred ground, not to be ventured onto without great care. Daunting for a filmmaker. But the things that place Dunkirk so firmly at the heart of a nation's self-image are the very qualities that make it one of the greatest stories in human history. Irresistible to a filmmaker.<br><br>This film required a remarkable creative team, and Hans Zimmer, as well as having been a valued member in the past, knows how to assemble his own great team. From our first meeting, where I described to the percussionist, Satnam Ramgotra, the unusual rhythmic structure of the script and how it needed to be amplified by the music, through the finishing touches applied by Lorne Balfe during our last weeks of mixing, the importance of teamwork was paramount. The process nicely echoed the circumstances of the events we were trying to honour- a triumph of communal effort, not individual heroism.<br><br>When I called Hans one night with a one word suggestion- "Nimrod", I wasn't sure he'd accept experimenting with an existing theme for the climax of the film. To my surprise, he knew just who to call to achieve the deconstruction of Elgar's monumental theme, a theme as beloved to the English as Dunkirk itself, often played at ceremonial occasions and funerals. It's a theme which (I never admitted to Hans) I am incapable of hearing without feeling the surprising weight of my father's coffin on my shoulder. Hans brought in Benjamin Wallfisch, who, in collaboration with the great music editor Alex Gibson and myself, fashioned a modern reworking that grows out of the sights and sounds of the movie- tapping the original's resonances without feeling unearned. Hans's brass accents complete the piece's power to move without sentimentalizing.<br><br>Hans went on to incorporate Elgar's theme elsewhere in the score, a score that on this album has been divided into cues, but which in the film plays as one long piece with a unifying and complex rhythmic and tonal structure. The structure of the screenplay itself builds upon the shepherd tone concepts I first explored with composer David Julyan in the soundtrack for "The Prestige", but here Zimmer's team (in particular Andy Page and Andrew Kawczynski) and I added a whole new rhythmical structure. This can't be fully represented on the album, but in the film it is able to integrate sound effects and even story structure into the very fabric of the music in a new and unique manner.<br><br>The rigid structure, to which we adamntly stuck, at times proved frustrating for the musicians, but they persevered and produced extraordinary cues based on unusual solutions (such as a recording of my watch that Hans and his team adapted into many different rhythmic voices). The disciplined procedural approach stopped the music for "Dunkirk" from ever resorting to arbitrary cinematic emotionalism, something Hans and I always felt was vital, given the inherent emotional heft of the real life events. This has been a long and hard journey, but I am proud of the final results, and hope that you will share my appreciation for the talent of the artists who worked so hard for so long on this score.<br><br>CHRISTOPHER NOLANI don't think emotion and melodies = Oscar worthy. Dunkirk's score fits in with the movie far better than Chappie.Saw the film again last night and there are a ton of great cues missing, especially from the first half of the film. It's a crime the cue when they carry the stretcher onto the ship wasn't included.
The answer is: Christopher Nolan ;-)It doesn't crossfade as much as, say, The Dark Knight Rises or Inception, but there is  very rarely dead air. I haven't listened enough times to determine when it does and doesn't crossfade, but the tracks are, at least, very closely edited together.I Love Hans' stuff but this score didn't really do it for me. I don't see how people are repping this as Oscar worthy but trash something like CHAPPiEs score, something with actual emotion and melodies.This soundtrack will win an oscar . It's great to see Balfe back with Zimmer. Dream teamDoes anyone know whether the cd version actually has the cues crossfading into each other? Since in the film the score plays almost as an entire cue, it would have made sense if they did that. It sounds like some cues in the digital version end kind of awkwardly, like 'Impulse' and 'Home'. These cues fade out while there still seems to be some instrumentation progression going on. Hence the crossfade thought...
Oooh credits. I'm guessing from these it's going to be disqualified from entering Oscar nominations because<br>1. Use of a classical musical piece throughout<br>2. More than one guy is credited.<br><br>Anyway, that's how Hans always liked, crediting everyone.I have to agree on the soundtrack being mostly unlistenable...<br><br>This is nothing like Inception, or even Interstellar.<br><br>I seriously doubt there's going to be a big stink made about any track from this score the likes of "No Time For Caution" back in 14...<br><br>I tried...I tried real hard to find something to keep me interested in this score, but I personally couldn't find anything. Most of it is tension building noise. I'm sure it's great within the film, but outside the film? Not so much.<br><br>I guess Zimmer is on "retirement mode" now...He's slowing down and not wanting to produce the rockin stuff that he used to...I can't blame him, but still...This score sounds like a total experiment.Sorry bud...<br><br>Its not.Hi everyone, does anyone know the name of the music in the Dunkirk Trailer 1 at 01:30? It doesn't not seem to be in the score, I'm assuming it's not in the movie, I'm going to see it Sunday. If anyone knows the music or where to find it, please Comment, thanks!Tina had a lot of work to do here!
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Additional Music - Choir Conductor - Song ProducerAdditional Music - Conductor - Choir Conductor
Hans ZimmerHarry Gregson-WilliamsRupert Gregson-WilliamsKlaus Badelt
ComposerAdditional MusicAdditional MusicAdditional Music
The Prince Of Egypt (Complete Score)
Label: Unofficial Release
Length: 81'54
HZimmer.com rating:        5/5
Fans rating:     rate at 1 out of 5 rate at 2 out of 5 rate at 3 out of 5 rate at 4 out of 5 rate at 5 out of 5   2/5 (3273 votes)
  1. Deliver Us (7:16)
    Stephen Schwartz, Hans Zimmer, Martin Erskine, Andrew Lippa
  2. Chariot Race (3:02)
    Hans Zimmer
  3. Brothers (4:24)
    Hans Zimmer
  4. Meeting Tzipporah (0:19)
    Rupert Gregson-Williams
  5. Desert Flower (1:37)
    Hans Zimmer
  6. Following Tzipporah (1:00)
    Hans Zimmer
  7. All I Ever Wanted (With Queen's Reprise) (2:52)
    Stephen Schwartz, Hans Zimmer, Harry Gregson-Williams
  8. Hieroglyphic Nightmare (1:38)
    Stephen Schwartz, Hans Zimmer, Harry Gregson-Williams
  9. Moses & Seti (1:46)
    Stephen Schwartz, Hans Zimmer
  10. Beating - Gate - Desert Montage (5:33)
    Stephen Schwartz, Hans Zimmer, Klaus Badelt
  11. Camel Boogie (2:12)
    Stephen Schwartz, Hans Zimmer, Rupert Gregson-Williams
  12. Through Heaven's Eyes (3:42)
    Stephen Schwartz, Gavin Greenaway
  13. Moses Finds Cave (1:14)
    Stephen Schwartz, Hans Zimmer, Harry Gregson-Williams
  14. Burning Bush - Remember (7:55)
    Stephen Schwartz, Hans Zimmer
  15. Meeting Pharaoh (1:26)
    Hans Zimmer, Rupert Gregson-Williams
  16. Playing With The Big Boys (2:53)
    Stephen Schwartz, John Powell
  17. Line In The Sand (1:33)
    Hans Zimmer, Harry Gregson-Williams
  18. Moses Reviled (3:44)
    Stephen Schwartz, Hans Zimmer
  19. The Plagues (3:23)
    Stephen Schwartz, Gavin Greenaway
  20. Memory Lane - Ultimatum (3:52)
    Hans Zimmer
  21. Death Of The First Born (1:08)
    Hans Zimmer
  22. When You Believe (4:55)
    Stephen Schwartz, Hans Zimmer
  23. Red Sea (5:51)
    Hans Zimmer
  24. Epilogue (3:39)
    Stephen Schwartz, Hans Zimmer, Gavin Greenaway
  25. Epilogue (Alternate) (3:25)
    Stephen Schwartz, Hans Zimmer
  26. The Prince Of Egypt Trailer Music (1:46)
    Hans Zimmer, Harry Gregson-Williams
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Mike (OTM) reply Replies: 1 || 2017-03-25 21:18:05
So I just picked up the Collector's Edition CD that was released (the one with the 3 extra cues), and i have to say, I'm glad I did. Having the Chariot Race and Epilogue (alternate version, granted) really rounds out the main CD. Those were two highlights. Having "Moses Reviled" is also good, as that was a strong cue (called "It is Only the Beginning" on the CD). The whole score has essentially been released when you put the main CD and the collector's one together (though sadly, the film version of the Epilogue isn't here).

I got the thing for $3.00. I was inspired to look into it due to a comment about it below.


Mike (OTM)2017-03-25 21:24:40
Not to double post, but can I just say that both versions of the Finale - the one using Hans' theme and the one using the Deliver Us theme - are really, really epic? Zimmer outdid himself with this segment particularly. The Prince of Egypt is a truly underrated score.

Anonymous reply Replies: 4 || 2016-07-06 01:47:52
Okay. Listen to Hero from 13 Hours, then Burning Bush...


Waymann2016-07-06 08:38:47
I knew it. When I saw 13 Hours I kept thinking about another score that sounded just like that theme.


Mike2016-07-06 17:12:02
Yikes! Temp track? Well, Hans was producer on 13 Hours... Maybe that was his suggestion. :P


Mike2016-07-06 17:15:02
The similarity I caught while watching the film was the "Deshi Deshi Basara" percussion in "Welcome to Benghazi." It sounds like Zimmer-temp (or Zimmer suggestions?) was used in a couple places.


jrej35552017-03-20 13:56:02
WOW!!! That is shameless!

Anonymous reply Replies: 0 || 2017-03-19 22:30:51
The Collector's Edition contains "Moses Reviled," along with "Chariot Race" and Zimmer's original Epilogue as one track, is that correct?

Mike reply Replies: 6 || 2016-07-04 20:27:10
Interesting little thing... If you listen to the director commentary on the film, they say that Hans' original idea for the Burning Bush sequence had "choir and organ and stuff," but they asked for a re-write because that was stereotypical and they wanted something different for the scene. I love the final version, too, but I can't help wanting to know what the original sounded like.


Hybrid Soldier2016-07-04 21:12:50
Stay from Interstellar ?! :P


Mike2016-07-04 22:37:01
Quite possibly. Has Hans done any interviews for this score? I haven't found any.

Also a little interesting was that the directors mentioned Harry Gregson-Williams by name with regard to the "Line in the Sand" cue. As Rameses opens his eyes while holding the ring, one of them talks about how it was "scary" and "that was Harry Gregson-Williams' idea." :P


anonymous2016-07-04 22:58:47
on a somewhat related page... zimmer produced the first use of "all i ever wanted" sung by moses, and harry did the queen's reprise, right? or did harry do both?


Hybrid Soldier2016-07-04 23:39:34
Yep !

To be complete on POE, on the cuesheet HGW & RGW get 100% on the following cues :

HGW :
Hieroglyphic Nightmare (with Schwartz)
Moses Finds Cave
Line In The Sand

RGW :
Meeting Tzipporah
Camel Boogie
Meeting Pharaoh

Klaus got 0, lol, did some arranging...

Up until the early 2000s, HZ used to give 100% of some of the cues to additionals even when it used some of his music. But then all the rest of the cues were credited to HZ only while some were arranged by these guys... So I guess nowadays way of doing is not so bad...


Mike2016-07-05 00:11:29
Here's something I've wondered:

Do Hans' additional guys do substantially more than they did in the 90's / 2000's, or is it really a matter of crediting differently like your comment suggests? Cause it seems like Zimmer had a lot more "solo" credits on his scores back then (70% of cues, typically), whereas now he'll have only 2 or 3 on a given score. So did Hans' methodology change at some point and now he's more collaborative than he used to be, or is it mostly that now he credits "arrangers" and he didn't used to?


Hybrid Soldier2016-07-05 00:19:22
Well, I don't think it's much different, in proportion it's the same thing...

Remember in the 90s he had to do scores quite short, even big action films were 90 min long...

Now when you have an Inception, POTC or whatever, it's always between 2 & 2,5 hours of music to write... And relatively less time to write them ! lol

Hybrid Soldier reply Replies: 4 || 2015-01-07 22:16:25
Found some credits for it, should look like that ! :)


Mike2015-01-08 00:24:58
Thank you! I've wanted these forever!


Mike2015-01-08 00:26:18
Where Stephen Schwartz is credited, it's because it contains some of his song material, but Zimmer did the cue, right?


Hybrid Soldier2015-01-08 11:42:03
Yeah there are quotes of the songs but Schwartz only did the songs...

But credit is due... :)


NM2015-01-08 22:29:13
Haha, the ones I guessed were HGW were spot on. I have no idea how I was able to tell.

Anonymous reply Replies: 9 || 2014-12-06 16:08:19
Zimmer made Such. An Epic. Arrangement. of Deliver Us for that last scene. My goodness. It gets me every time.


Mike2014-12-06 16:15:53
This is a sadly under-spoken-about score. It's probably one of my favorite Zimmer scores of the 1990s, and it uses his big, epic sound to really good effect. It just manages to complement the film really well, and it even has a nice Eastern flair sometimes.


Edmund Meinerts2014-12-06 23:43:12
This is something like my third-favorite Zimmer score. I don't think he ever quite managed to go as grandiose and BIG as this again, not even in Gladiator.

On a vaguely related note, wouldn't it have been hilarious if Ridley Scott had decided to reunite with Hans on Exodus: Gods and Kings of all things? :p


Hybrid Soldier2014-12-06 23:53:55
I would have loved to... :(


Adam2014-12-07 00:13:20
I would have loved that as well :(

Hey Hybrid, do you know why Ridley & Hans stopped working together? They were partners since Thelma & Louise. I mess their collaborations :'(


Ds2014-12-07 00:40:10
Edmund, I think PotC 3 and King Arthur are even BIGGER than this one :-)


Edmund Meinerts2014-12-07 02:08:36
Funny that you mention those two, Ds, they're my other two favorite Zimmer scores. ;)

Yeah, they're both pretty massive, but more in an action-score kind of way. I don't think King Arthur in particular hits quite the same grandly religious heights as Prince of Egypt. For overall size At World's End wins everything, though.


NM2014-12-07 09:07:50
Nice to see some appreciation for this score. I really love it.


Hybrid Soldier2014-12-07 09:10:39
Hans & Ridley isn't gonna happen ever again. They keep talking about each other a lot in interviews & stuff, they are still in contact, phoning or dining from time to time...

But the look on Hans' face when I asked him said it all... He just said they were "out of synch"...


Anonymous2015-01-07 22:36:28
Oh good grief. When "you" asked him?? LOL

Mike reply Replies: 0 || 2014-07-29 19:54:28
Good to see this one up here!

NM reply Replies: 0 || 2014-07-25 18:00:38
The theme for the two brothers is heartbreaking, I wish this score got more attention. There's some really great thematic writing.

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The Prince Of Egypt (Complete Score) soundtrack - Hans Zimmer 1998