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Yeah, 30-ish seconds into Do You Bleed?"Reminiscent Therapy" is amazing in the way it incorporates a lot of Williams' classic stuff making it feel very natural and organic, like it's part Powell's themes, like he does with "The Adentures of Han".<br><br>This is a really great scoreHe is the chosen one, the one who will bring balance to the film music world...Thats just 'do you bleed?' with a small insert?Haha, It's as the prophecy foretold.
John Powell, the great uniter of film music fans@MrZimmerFan<br><br>I actually like Rogue One, and I do understand why it leans so heavily on the original themes. Here the themes are incorporated more as fan service, but Powell is able to do wonders with interpolating them with his material. <br><br>And something I forgot to mention, this score reminds me so much of Pan in the action sequences. The percussion and brass writing is great lolim surprised how Powell uses his ANTZ percussion in this!<br><br>The track Train Heist, Into The Maw is good example of it.<br><br>This is the only score that will please the gang at JW and HZ alike.When JWFan and HZ.com are discussing the same score....'but not as heavily as Rogue One'<br><br>Because Rogue One have conections with certain aspects or characters from the OT?<br><br>An here you have a track with three themes (or cues) with no conections with the OT, Rogue One have more sense... but the score is fricking awesome :)
So first impressions:<br><br>JP knocked this one out of the park! The whole score has this excellent swashbuckling vibe, which is surprisingly aggressive during the action sequences (entirely due to his trademark percussion).<br><br>The writing style is really interesting, it’s basically John Powell doing his usual style but with some Williams flourishes, especially during the softer cues. The Star Wars themes do return, but not as heavily as Rogue One. And of course the JW cue is great, although surprisingly structured more as an action cue as opposed to a concert suite.<br><br>And for some reason the Han theme sounds vaguely similar to Poe’s theme from Force Awakens.Let’s just say “Reminiscience Therapy”.... hold onto your seats! ;-)This score is awesome!! Powell did a great job at making a score that's differet than all the other SW scores, but still you know it's a SW score. He reprised Williams' theme brilliantly and I can't stop to listen to it!!!what about the music when batman makes it back to the cave and lex opens the case of kryptonite. cant find it in theseYeah I can't agree that Inception or Interstellar are superior pieces of scoring. Certainly not in structure, thematic development, etc. <br><br>What defined those scores is the vision behind them more so than the execution. In so many ways, that is opposite of The World's End. Interstellar is a brilliant score that managed to provide each scene with a simplistic tone, but one that captured the atmosphere behind the scenes perfectly, such as the unique use of the organ. Same with Inception with the guitars. <br><br>With a World's End, the vision is nothing special. It is a rock and roll twist to classic music. But the execution brings enormous power and gravitas to the movie.<br><br>I would sum it up by saying that in Interstellar and Inception, the creation of the music drives the movie's ideas while in At World's End, the movie drives the creation of the music.
Nazg&#251;l for Azog I will never forgive. It's not a Servant of Sauron theme, it's a Ringwraith theme, and Azog's not a Ringwraith, he's a goddam Orc, and that theme doesn't belong there, full stop. It was just put there because it sounds "epic" and would "pump up the action scene". Gondor Restored at the end is just as stupid. And the Dreaming of Bag End theme for Bilbo is indeed lovely, and would have been lovelier still if it actually appeared in the movie. Instead it just gets replaced by copy/pasted Hobbit music from LOTR instead because Peter Jackson desperately wants his audience to remember how good those movies were in lieu of the Hobbit ones being any good on their own. Needless to say it goes missing entirely from the second and third score...along with the Misty Mountains melody (the strongest theme of the first one). I still really like those scores overall but they got absolutely butchered in terms of their thematic usage in the films. Then again those movies were an absolute clusterfuck so I shouldn't be surprised.<br><br>WRT Harry Potter, the 3 note theme does work okay for Voldemort, except that there's already a longer, separate Voldemort theme in Philosopher's, one that I like even more, and which only gets used once in Chamber (when Riddle rearranges the letters). I can understand liking Chamber better than Philosopher when you compare the albums, but in terms of the complete scores there's no contest at all, Philosopher wins by a country mile because of Chamber's rehash issues (and there are some good cues missing from the album, such as the Troll and Forbidden Forest scenes).@Edmund<br>The thing with the Nolan scores (at least Interstellar/Inception) is that they are repetitive, in as much as being built heavily around the suites that I’m guessing they use to edit and temp the film. <br>And while the themes are simple I do think they are structured in a unique enough way which builds emotional resonance through the gradual increase in chords/volume/speed/etc. Even Dunkirk is a relatively simple score theme wise, but is so technically complex.<br><br>And personally I’ve never been in love with Inception. I admire it on a technical level, but outside of “Time” I find it to be a fairly cold score. Obviously what it was meant to do so not a complaint, more of a personal preference thing.You know, I actually like Chamber of Secrets much more than Philosopher's Stone. It has the best moments from that score with improved themes. (I actually like the 3 note motif for Voldemort better than it being used for the stone, it already sounded like the Sith theme from Star Wars so might as well go all the way with it.) It felt more tight, better paced, and had an overall more energetic feel to it.<br><br>The Hobbit, I'm not entirely sure where you're getting heartbreaking from. If you mean the state of its release I absolutely agree, if you're talking about its reprisals the only one I had any issue with was the Return of the King/Gondor Restored theme which had nothing to do with Thorin and Bilbo's relationship. <br><br>The Nazghul theme being used for Azog I thought was fine as he was a servant of Sauron in the movies, History of the Ring and Gollum's themes were used effectively, and the new thematic material for the first film, I thought was wonderful. The themes A Baggins of Bag-End and The Lonely Mountain song being used as a Fellowship type of theme are the greatest highlights for me.See, I don't find Inception or Interstellar (or Thin Red Line) all that "complex". Especially not compared to At World's End (how many themes are in that score, like 15? 20? Pretty much all of which show up in rapid succession during the Maelstrom battle?). The Nolan scores are more about building up around very simple conceptual ideas.<br><br>Unless you're talking about emotional complexity, which is a very different thing and not really possible to objectively judge...You know, I don't think I've ever really gotten the full story surrounding that score. I've heard conflicting reports. My personal belief is that Ross did little to no substantial composition and that all the new stuff (themes, suites, new cues and also significantly fresh arrangements of old material) is pure Williams, but that film is full of reused music from the first film (it's actually quite frustrating, not as bad as On Stranger Tides or as heartbreaking as The Hobbit, but a bit of a rehashy mess and it makes the key error of using the Philosopher's Stone motif as a Voldemort theme). That's where I think Ross comes in and was responsible for taking those cues verbatim from the first film and tweaking/rearranging them just enough to match the timings of the scenes without actually adding any of his "own" notes. His role is likely somewhere between additional music, arrangement and music editing (but as Hybrid likes to point out, oftentimes those sorts of roles are really blurred and overlapping anyways).<br><br>A guy at jwfan did an analysis that helps understand the nature of that score, but be warned, it goes *really* deep:<br><br>www.jwfan.com/forums/index.php?/topic/27619-finished-chamber -of-secrets-thematic-and-originality-analysis/
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Henry JackmanHalli CautheryStephen HiltonAlex Belcher
ComposerAdditional MusicAdditional MusicAdditional Music
Kong - Skull Island
Label: WaterTower Music
Length: 56'42
HZimmer.com rating:        Not yet rated
Fans rating:     rate at 1 out of 5 rate at 2 out of 5 rate at 3 out of 5 rate at 4 out of 5 rate at 5 out of 5   2/5 (2922 votes)
  1. South Pacific (0:35)
    Henry Jackman, Stephen Hilton
  2. The Beach (1:27)
    Henry Jackman, Stephen Hilton, Jack Dolman
  3. Project Monarch (2:02)
    Henry Jackman, Stephen Hilton
  4. Packard's Blues (1:14)
    Henry Jackman, Alex Belcher
  5. Assembling The Team (1:48)
    Henry Jackman, Halli Cauthery
  6. Into The Storm (2:44)
    Henry Jackman, Alex Belcher, Stephen Hilton
  7. The Island (1:16)
    Henry Jackman
  8. Kong The Destroyer (3:43)
    Henry Jackman, Stephen Hilton
  9. Monsters Exist (2:27)
    Henry Jackman, Stephen Hilton
  10. Spider Attack (1:39)
    Henry Jackman, Alex Belcher, Stephen Hilton
  11. Dominant Species (2:00)
    Henry Jackman, Halli Cauthery, Alex Belcher
  12. The Temple (5:47)
    Henry Jackman, Stephen Hilton
  13. Grey Fox (2:33)
    Henry Jackman, Halli Cauthery
  14. Kong The Protector (1:49)
    Henry Jackman, Halli Cauthery
  15. Marlow's Farewell (2:37)
    Henry Jackman, Halli Cauthery, Stephen Hilton
  16. Lost (1:27)
    Henry Jackman, Alex Belcher, Stephen Hilton
  17. The Boneyard (1:52)
    Henry Jackman, Alex Belcher, Stephen Hilton
  18. Ambushed (2:21)
    Henry Jackman, Francesco Lupica
  19. The Heart Of Kong (2:11)
    Henry Jackman, Halli Cauthery, Stephen Hilton
  20. Man Vs. Beast (2:31)
    Henry Jackman, Alex Belcher, Stephen Hilton
  21. Creature From The Deep (2:44)
    Henry Jackman, Halli Cauthery, Stephen Hilton
  22. The Battle Of Skull Island (5:46)
    Henry Jackman, Stephen Hilton
  23. King Kong (2:42)
    Henry Jackman, Halli Cauthery
  24. Monster Mash (Bonus Track) (1:27)
    Henry Jackman, Halli Cauthery
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Hybrid Soldier reply Replies: 1 || 2017-06-06 23:30:55
Composer credits for those interested !


Edmund Meinerts2017-06-06 23:41:07
Thanks as always :)

Jordan reply Replies: 0 || 2017-03-21 21:00:43
I received today the CD edition, ordered via WaterTower Music shop, and very surprised that it's not a CD-R ! It's a real pressed disc.

Adrian reply Replies: 0 || 2017-03-12 00:36:37
Amazing soundtrack, amazing movie

Edmund Meinerts reply Replies: 1 || 2017-03-04 01:04:55
...and I just realized I used the word "impressed" or some variation thereupon four times in that post. *facepalm*


Edmund Meinerts2017-03-04 01:05:32
And this was supposed to be a reply to the other thread!

...I think I need to go to bed. :p

mpolonest123 reply Replies: 4 || 2017-03-03 17:32:08
:-/ Hmmmmm.... This is really an underwhelming score. It's not bad by any means, but most of the action/suspense music is incredibly generic. And the horn of doom... really?!?

I will say, I do like the use of electric guitars in the first half ("The Island" is pretty badass) and there is some decent orchestral writing in the second. There just seems to be something missing that would make this feel more inspired.


MrZimmerFan2017-03-03 18:56:17
I'm not the biggest fan of Jackman, but I think is a enyoable score (honestly, I prefer Uncharted or Pixels, but I have fun with this). I like the guitars with orchestra (The Battle of Skull Island have this epic/heroic theme for Kong or the textures for Monsters Exists)

Not the worst.


mpolonest123 2017-03-03 20:58:59
Like I said, it's not a bad score at all. I won't even compare it to JNH because the film is obviously a different beast entirely. The problem is the lack of a distinct voice mixed with some bland, modern action material that borrows heavily from Silvestri and Brian Tyler.

Jackman has always had trouble finding his sound. His scores are always enjoyable but they seem to have trouble being distinct enough. That's one reason I love TWS. The electronic style mixed with the traditional action scoring allow it to be fresh and original, no matter how harsh it gets. If you didn't tell me Jackman scored Skull Island I honestly wouldn't be able to tell you who did.


Macejko2017-03-03 22:39:14
Yes, Jackman underdelivers yet again. I swear, the best thing that came out of his career was Matt Margeson.


Edmund Meinerts2017-03-04 01:04:18
Heh. That's harsh, but I have to admit that Margeson's recent work has impressed me more than Jackman's. The latter had some excellent scores early in his career, but since Wreck-it Ralph he hasn't really impressed me...was not at all impressed with his Captain America scores and even his latest animated/comedy scores like Big Hero 6 and Pixels were missing something. Although I did think Birth of a Nation last year was an impressive new direction for him.

Mortifer V. reply Replies: 0 || 2017-03-03 20:35:56
Disappointing.

JBSO99 reply Replies: 0 || 2017-02-27 15:59:50
In the official youtube chanel of WaterTower Music you can listen to the track "The Island" and it sounds amazing. I hope the score will be a s epic as this track!

Dimitris Krommidas reply Replies: 2 || 2017-02-26 20:56:40
It will be a great epic score, Jackman is great, but shame that it doesn't get a cd release.


Jordan2017-02-27 09:33:05
CD available on the WaterTower website. I ordered one.


Dimitris Krommidas2017-02-27 15:08:29
Thanks!

Iamtommie reply Replies: 0 || 2017-02-26 19:50:27
Cool, can't wait!!!!

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Kong - Skull Island soundtrack - Henry Jackman 2017