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It's not in the OST release... :/Do anyone know what was that soundtrack that plays at opening scene? There where The Flying Dutchman rises from the sea, adn will and Henry have a little discourse. I think it`s some variation of "one day".I love this musicStill doesn't beat Lego Batman for best soundtrack this year. But a close secondI saw the movie tonight and I think that the music is great on the album, but in the movie it's fantastic. It gives something special and something extra to a lot of scenes. I think Zanelli did a great job on the score, with the use if new and old themes.
"This is the best score of the franchise since At World's End."<br><br>Watch out you don't trip over that low bar. ;)Maybe because it is IDENTICAL the another theme of the same series?I haven't seen the movie yet, but I will soon, but I've heard the soundtrack and I have only one thing to say. This is the best score of the franchise since At World's End. I had tears in my eyes every time an old theme played. I liked the score for On Stranger Tides, but I didn't like how it relied too much on older themes. I appreciate this score for not using the Ship battle theme and the rolling cage chase motif which I'm kinda tired of hearing them. I love the clever use of One Day as a theme for Henry Turner. Of course, everytime Jack's Themes (both the intro theme, the cello theme, and his DMC theme) and He's A Pirate show up, I can't help but smile and jump up and down. What about the new stuff? A lot of people have criticized Salazar's Theme for sounding like Blackbeard. It does don't get me wrong, but Zanelli isn't the first person to do this. The Winter Soldier is derived from Why So Serious. Optimus Prime's theme is IDENTICAL to the Knights March from King Arthur. Discombobulate from Sherlock Holmes, Absurdity from The Lone Ranger, and The Red Capes Are Coming from Batman v. Superman ALL SOUND THE SAME. They're awesome, but similar. Why is it so bad now? I like the rock elements in Salazar's theme and it makes it quite scary. Carina's Theme (The Brightest Star in the North) is also the main theme of the movie and it is perfect beyond belief. Her theme very much resembles past love themes, but it has a sense of herorism to it. I always gravitate to composer's themes for female characters (John Williams with my girls from Star Wars). The new adventure theme is epic! It does sound like He's A Pirate, but it is very catchy. I don't know what the score sounds like in the movie, but it sounds really good on the official soundtrack. To end this, all the action music is incredibly fun. Hans should be proud. Here are my top  5 favorite tracks:<br><br>1. Beyond My Beloved Horizon<br>2. The Brightest Star in the North<br>3. No Woman Has Ever Handled My Herschel<br>4. My Name is Barbossa<br>5. The Dying GullThe orchestrators are the same.<br><br>You really think the other composers aren't busy enough these days ? It was 10 YEARS ago ! lol*necessary (sorry about my english)
This composing lacks on every important aspect that make a film music score so nessesary to the movie itself. This music has no evolution, has no entity or identity.<br><br>You only know that you are listening the "WONDER WOMAN" ost when you listen the references to the now mythical (Zimmer) theme from Batman v Superman. And when this theme sounds in this composing it feels totaly out of place, really a shame.<br><br>Beyond, this music could easily work with another summer blockbuster like Transformers, Pirates of the Caribbean or a generic action flick.<br>For years I’ve been defending "DC" music works against the  Marvel’s (MCU) soul-less soundtracks. And now after three awesome ost (DCEU) I have to eat my words.<br>Is not necessary to talk about how great are Man of Steel, Batman v Superman and Suicide Squad (ok, this last less, but with a epic main theme). You only need to listen Rupert Gregson-Williams Wonder Woman, and then play one of this three compositions.<br><br>But the most disappointing thing, is the great missed oportunity with the Wonder Woman Theme last year. That exotic tone, that woman strengh that you feel when you are listen this epic theme. Here all this feelings are lost. At the end, another Zimmer-Like álbum. <br>But like always in the "Zimmer-Like" longtime álbum library, not that height, not that quality, because if Wonder Woman’s score remebers us something, is one and clear truth: Only Exists One Hans Zimmer.<br>What I don't understand is why couldn't they at least aim for the best soundscape this franchise have had by bringing the rest of the team from AWE of composers, arrangers and orchestrators back. If we look at AWE, apart from Zimmer, there was Zanelli, Jackman, Glennie-Smith, Balfe, Örvarsson, Gire and Sponsler on board. If they could choose one lead composer in Zimmer's absence, then whatever some dude wrote would at least sound interesting because of the colorful instrumentation and big, fresh orchestral sound AWE had. Or maybe, just rearrange old themes from the other movies in true AWE style would work just as well. There's plenty of material from POTC 1 that hasn't been used in the other films, and much of it would shine if orchestrated and performed in AWE's sonic fashion rather than the cheap sound the first film had.Fantastic album, particularly HGW's Metal Gear Solid and HZ's Call of Duty! Highly recommendedZanelli made a wonderful job with Zimmer's themes.<br>The new themes are great too, but he really did Zimmer's themes justice. I like the continuity.<br>Track 9.El Matador Del Mar, my favorite on the album.Maybe it's the end credits after the song
I also love the appearence of the theme in the end of Trafalgar Celebartion. Does anybody know what Action Reaction exactly is? It sounds a bit like a remix from the main theme but it could also be a part of the movie soundtrack. i don't know but it sounds cool.After listening to it the first time I thought this was a very good Zimmer score, but suddenly realized it was Rupert Gregson-Williams and that's a very good thing because he has been able to bring this Zimmer classic sound but with his own voice, as they said above here, with Last Samurai-like anthems and also remind me a bit of the second half of Hacksaw Ridge score, and that's great.<br>I specially liked No Man's Land, Wrath of Wonder Woman, Hell Hath No Fury and Lightning Strikes (well, in general, the second half is pretty awesome with many action heroic themes).<br>Cannot wait to hear it in the context of the movie.Love Maestro in The Holiday! The music keeps bringing me back to the movie. Something delightful about it!This is "One day" theme of the third soundtrack xDListen to 12:38 above and then also Main Title or Top of the World from Last of the Mohicans. Trevor Jones should have a listen.
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Harry Gregson-WilliamsTrevor RabinHans ZimmerDon Harper
ComposerComposerAdditional MusicAdditional Music
Armageddon (Expanded Score)
Label: Unofficial Release
Length: 132'29
HZimmer.com rating:        5/5
Fans rating:     rate at 1 out of 5 rate at 2 out of 5 rate at 3 out of 5 rate at 4 out of 5 rate at 5 out of 5   2/5 (7093 votes)
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  1. Main Title (4:49)
    Harry Gregson-Williams, Steve Jablonsky (Trevor Rabin)
  2. Boffer Reports In (0:23)
    Steve Jablonsky
  3. Meteor Shower (2:16)
    Harry Gregson-Williams
  4. The Hubble (0:42)
    Harry Gregson-Williams
  5. Global Killer (0:40)
    Harry Gregson-Williams
  6. Finding Grace (1:06)
    Trevor Rabin
  7. Oil Rig (2:00)
    Trevor Rabin, Paul Linford
  8. We Drill! (1:36)
    Trevor Rabin
  9. Call To Duty (1:14)
    Trevor Rabin
  10. Harry Arrives At Nasa (1:01)
    Trevor Rabin, Don Harper
  11. Top Secret (2:25)
    Steve Jablonsky (Trevor Rabin)
  12. The Freedom Crew (0:46)
    Trevor Rabin
  13. 5 Words (1:37)
    Trevor Rabin, Paul Linford
  14. Demands (1:40)
    Trevor Rabin
  15. X-71 (1:33)
    Trevor Rabin, Don Harper
  16. Weightless Simulation (0:39)
    Trevor Rabin, Don Harper
  17. Flight Plan (0:38)
    Trevor Rabin
  18. Love Nest (1:03)
    Harry Gregson-Williams
  19. Armadillo (1:15)
    Trevor Rabin
  20. Underwater Simulation (2:13)
    Trevor Rabin, Don Harper
  21. Animal Crackers (2:35)
    Harry Gregson-Williams, Diane Warren, Steven Tyler
  22. Leaving (2:31)
    Trevor Rabin, Don Harper
  23. Shanghai (2:54)
    Harry Gregson-Williams, Steve Jablonsky (Trevor Rabin)
  24. Harry And Grace Make Peace (1:45)
    Trevor Rabin
  25. Preparing For Launch (0:52)
    Harry Gregson-Williams
  26. The Launch (7:52)
    Trevor Rabin, Don Harper
  27. Mir (1:43)
    Harry Gregson-Williams, Steve Jablonsky
  28. Death Of Mir 1 (2:06)
    Trevor Rabin (Harry Gregson-Williams)
  29. Death Of Mir 2 (1:51)
    Trevor Rabin, Don Harper
  30. Radio Silence (1:16)
    Harry Gregson-Williams, Steve Jablonsky
  31. Asteroid Chase (6:53)
    Hans Zimmer, John Van Tongeren (Harry Gregson-Williams)
  32. Goodbye Independence (1:25)
    Harry Gregson-Williams
  33. Fallen Comrades (4:11)
    Harry Gregson-Williams
  34. The Drilling (2:56)
    Trevor Rabin
  35. 57 Feet (1:37)
    Harry Gregson-Williams, Steve Jablonsky
  36. Secondary Protocol (8:27)
    Harry Gregson-Williams, Steve Jablonsky
  37. Back In Business (1:36)
    Trevor Rabin
  38. Armadillo Jump (3:38)
    Harry Gregson-Williams, John Van Tongeren (Trevor Rabin)
  39. Russian Hero (0:22)
    Trevor Rabin
  40. Max Bites It (4:16)
    Harry Gregson-Williams, John Van Tongeren (Trevor Rabin)
  41. A.J.'s Return (4:27)
    Trevor Rabin, Don Harper
  42. Rockstorm (3:37)
    Harry Gregson-Williams, Steve Jablonsky
  43. Short Straws (3:44)
    Trevor Rabin, Don Harper
  44. Long Distance Goodbye (2:30)
    Trevor Rabin (Harry Gregson-Williams)
  45. Evacuation 1 (3:42)
    Trevor Rabin, Don Harper
  46. Evacuation 2 (1:48)
    Harry Gregson-Williams, John Van Tongeren
  47. A Wing And A Prayer (5:15)
    Trevor Rabin (Harry Gregson-Williams)
  48. Returning Home (Trailer) (3:14)
    Trevor Rabin
  49. American The Beautiful (Super Bowl) (0:44)
    Harry Gregson-Williams
  50. Meteor Shower (Alternate) (2:04)
    Harry Gregson-Williams (Trevor Rabin)
  51. Weightless Simulation (Alternate) (0:23)
    Trevor Rabin
  52. Armageddon Piano (Love Nest Alternate) (0:35)
    Trevor Rabin
  53. Animal Crackers (Alternate) (2:35)
    Harry Gregson-Williams, Trevor Rabin, Diane Warren, Steven Tyler
  54. Preparing For Launch (Alternate) (0:59)
    Harry Gregson-Williams
  55. The Drilling (Alternate) (2:52)
    Trevor Rabin, Paul Linford
  56. Long Distance Goodbye (Alternate) (3:05)
    Trevor Rabin
  57. Armageddon Suite (5:20)
    Trevor Rabin, Paul Linford
  58. Theme From Armageddon (3:07)
    Trevor Rabin, Steve Jablonsky
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Scorefan reply Replies: 1 || 2016-07-15 18:54:43
A cameo from Armageddon in tne new Ice Age movie. It was funny. The theme sounds with the scene where all walk through the dust in the middle of the movie.


Hybrid Soldier2016-07-15 19:58:16
Actually it kinda shocked me, it was a bad idea, poorly executed, they even used The Launch to parody the famous "slo-mo walk", but that part was actually scored in Arma with the HGW cue right before !! lol

buschleagueblazr reply Replies: 0 || 2015-09-19 05:31:27
I always wondered why the "Asteroid Chase" cue was my favorite.

david reply Replies: 0 || 2013-03-11 04:54:33
heres hoping that the man of steel theme sounds something like 6:27 of the launch, that bit would fit superman flying so damn well maybe with a bit of chorus!

Scorefan reply Replies: 5 || 2012-11-11 06:08:22
Armageddon is one of the best action scores in many years but also this version is just expanded because there are two missing cues: The complete part of the mir evacuation and death (like 5 minuts) and the film version of the evacuation when the ship leaves the asteroid and harry blow up the bomb
that's the two part missing scores
I hope some day, maybe La-La-Land or Intrada release the complete score recording sessions with those music parts


Mr Tweedy2012-11-11 11:29:56
Scorefan, you're half right half wrong...
Yes, there are a few cues missing, for sure. But these aren't the ones you mention. Mir Evacuation & Death is a mash up of the original Death of Mir cues, with some edited parts of Secondary Protocol and Meteor Shower thrown into the mix. It's not unreleased music, it's previously released music edited in a different way.
The Evacuation of the Asteroid is mostly Rabin's cue Evacuation, with Harry Gregson-Williams'insert "Evacuation 2" replacing the middle portion. Again, nothing new here.

But, you might have noticed that the Asteroid 4-notes theme from "Asteroid Chase" appears a few times in the film, with various arrangements (replacing a portion of "Top Secret" or "AJ's Return" for exemple) and the cue "Fallen Comrades" has a longer opening in the movie.
For sure these are only minor cues, and I'd be quite happy to get them, but the 2CD "expanded score", as we know it, is really awesome as it is !


Scorefan2012-11-12 06:47:45
@Mr Tweedy of course, yes i have the version, but also, i want to hear those film mixing versions. I hope, in the future, La La Land Records develop Armageddon, The Peacemaker, Crimson Tide, The Rock and yes, The Lion King


Trent Easton Navarro2012-11-12 22:07:52
If The Lion King will be released, it will be by Intrada. They have a deal with Disney (also hoping we'll see a release for Jerry Goldsmith's Mulan)

Second Armageddon and The Peacemaker. Those two deserve an official complete release.

As for Crimson Tide and The Rock, both original releases are fine for me (not that wouldn't buy an expanded version though :P)


Scorefan2012-11-14 20:05:36
@Trent Easton Navarro
well, i hope those will have an official release, just like La La Land made with Broken Arrow and Black Rain, also with more of Remote Control Scores, just like Days Of Thunder and Backdraft


Trent Easton Navarro2012-11-17 18:56:27
Yeah, I loved their releases for Broken Arrow and Black Rain, as well as Speed and Speed 2: Cruise Control.

Official releases for Days of Thunder and Backdraft would also be great. As well as Bird on a Wire

montana reply Replies: 1 || 2012-03-06 09:32:10
sheet !!! please Armageddon Piano (Love Nest Alternate)-Trevor Rabin & Harry Gregson-Williams .... si quelqu'un peu me dire ou la trouver.... Very thanks !!!!


iPhil2012-03-08 10:56:22
very difficult to find!
i found one, but don't know if it is what you're looking for!
but it's very bad quality!
sry

Trev´s Fan reply Replies: 0 || 2011-10-07 09:44:20
In 1998, you scored "Armageddon" which was a rather great hit, at the time. Characterised by many as an Epic Symphonic Score, blend with a distinct Rock spirit and tone, by having the guitar on a basic and principal role. How did you become involved in that project and of course, is there something particular you remember off these sessions?

Although I had recently done "Con Air" for Jerry Bruckheimer, he was concerned that I didn't have enough experience to take on a film the size of "Armageddon". So I had to basically write the main themes before I was hired. I think Jerry had showed a lot of courage hiring someone with very little experience. Luckily, I had the themes by the time I started which made the project a little easier...but it was a gruelling project

Tell us about the score, your inspiration on writing the beautiful love theme and the dense action pieces. Which is your favourite sequence, both in the movie and score?

I was very happy with the main theme which I used for anthemic moments, romantic moments, and others. It is very rewarding when a theme is so easily adapted to different emotions.


In that film you worked with Harry Gregson Williams and also other composers from the Media Ventures studios. Later on, you also worked with Harry on “Enemy of the State”. Due to these facts, completed by a tight relationship with the studio, a lot of people thought that you were also part of the Media Ventures Studios. Please Trevor, tell us the real story behind this, the making process of “Armageddon” and “Enemy of the State”. You know, a lot of people still think you´re part of that team!

My studio is quite far from Jerry Bruckheimer´s offices, so after "Con Air" he requested that I find a studio nearer him to compose "Armageddon". Media Ventures was near Jerry , and had a great room available, so I hired the room for "Armageddon". There was a lot of music on the movie and I had great help from Harry Gregson-Williams, Paul Linford and Don Harper. I was in the middle of doing "Jack Frost" when Jerry Bruckheimer called me for "Enemy of the State". I was concerned about the two films overlapping so I asked Harry, and Tim Heinz to help. I wrote the themes before starting "Enemy of the State" which like "Armageddon", made it a little easier. I love what Harry did on "Enemy" and we shared credit. Hans Zimmer and I have been friends for a long time, however I have nothing to do with Media Ventures, I think they're a great company.

Jack reply Replies: 0 || 2011-09-14 12:46:47
Correct me if I'm wrong, but this one is the original complete score (maybe recording sessions... ;-)), which was used to make the version that has been around on the net. The only difference consists in different track names. For example: track 2 "Boffer reports in" corresponds to tracks 2 "Defcon 3", and so on.

And maybe that's why all the Armageddon bootlegs listed on the website have been removed: this one is the only real deal!


xonix reply Replies: 0 || 2011-03-20 00:00:00
hey does anyone know if there is a way to get this score?
i cannot find it ANYWHERE!!

pls help :/

Hybrid Solder III reply Replies: 0 || 2011-02-23 00:00:00
Hey Guys,
I so much wanted this nick too...
Ok, that's not funny. Sorry. :)

Trent Easton Navarro reply Replies: 0 || 2011-02-22 00:00:00
@ /&/

Nice interview, but what's the point you're trying to make?

/&/ reply Replies: 0 || 2011-02-22 00:00:00
@ trent easton navarro
Trevor Rabin is a standalone composer. Not five additional composer needed to composed a good score. He is not one and the remote control and Armageddon only his third film works was. Bruckheimer would have it that he works with remote control. It's easy to understand!

/&/ reply Replies: 0 || 2011-02-22 00:00:00
Keep all of the statement of a page and look for other information. Bad boys 2, HGW has worked on this score. He is not listed at the end of the movie!

Adrian reply Replies: 0 || 2011-02-22 00:00:00
@ /&/

No composer works alone these days, not only for the crazy dead lines, but also because of some very picky directors (like Michael Bay) who ask for rewrites all the time.
Did you see the ''additional music''-army for LOTR 1,2 and 3? Of course, they have a different function than RCP-people, but it's just a fact that no composer works alone.
Even 'legend' John Williams works with other people, but they aren't credited so they are ghost writers!

Anonymous reply Replies: 0 || 2011-02-22 00:00:00
who did additional music on LOTR? First I've heard about it

Hybrid Soldier reply Replies: 0 || 2011-02-22 00:00:00
Howard Shore wrote the music written and arranged entirely alone.

He had printed his assistants the scores and revised !!

Hybrid Soldier reply Replies: 0 || 2011-02-22 00:00:00
Don't play that game using my nick, bro...

Cause you know, your english sucks ! ;)



Doesn't work, and anyway, I don't care about Shore and your debate guys, stop being ridiculous... I mean seriously...

Hybrid Soldier reply Replies: 0 || 2011-02-22 00:00:00
Yes I like the name and have you mind?

That is the law !

Adrian reply Replies: 0 || 2011-02-22 00:00:00
Yes that`s right !

Hybrid Soldier II reply Replies: 0 || 2011-02-22 00:00:00
OK Mr Hybrid Soldier !!

My Name is Hybrid Soldier II is that OK ???

Tim reply Replies: 0 || 2011-02-22 00:00:00
that's all kinda weird, guys :D ...a user steals the admin's nickname, other people contend that LOTR would have been co-written by add. composers and I've read the looongest post EVER on this page eventually (thx for the interview btw:) )...are these the highlights of the day or what?! :P

Prott reply Replies: 0 || 2011-02-21 00:00:00
/&/: Look at the tracklist :-) (he composed half of the score).

/&/ reply Replies: 0 || 2011-02-21 00:00:00
This Tracklist is not correct!

/&/ reply Replies: 0 || 2011-02-21 00:00:00
Trevor Rabin the Composer of all Tracks... Harry Gregson-Williams additional Composer and Jablonsky programmer and additional Composer of the Main Title Sequence.

Prott reply Replies: 0 || 2011-02-21 00:00:00
/&/ - Tracklist is correct. .-) These credits are from ASCAP.

/&/ reply Replies: 0 || 2011-02-21 00:00:00
Check out the End of the Movie

/&/ reply Replies: 0 || 2011-02-21 00:00:00
Trevor Rabin has not so many additional Composer like Hans Zimmer!

Prott reply Replies: 0 || 2011-02-21 00:00:00
Tim: Yeah, and he`s not even in the main credits ... only composer credited for this team effort is Trevor Rabin.
Maybe it has something to do with HGW calling Michael Bay "probably the most odious director alive"... :-)

Tim reply Replies: 0 || 2011-02-21 00:00:00
Yeah, he read my mind! The only thing that turns well is the score in Michael Bay movies...

/&/ reply Replies: 0 || 2011-02-21 00:00:00
INTERVIEW WITH TREVOR RABIN



Before starting with the questions, we would like to thank you for your participation; it's a privilege for us to have the chance to interview you.

Let's start talking about the beginnings of your musical education and career. How did you become interested in this area? When was the time you fell in love with the guitar?

My father was the first violinist of the “Johannesburg Symphony Orchestra”, my mother was a concert pianist, my brother was an extraordinary violinist and my sister a wonderful pianist and ballet dancer, so music was a way of life, and I studied piano from the age of six. I got my first guitar at the age of about 11 and taught myself. At the age of about 17, I was doing a lot of session work. I was in a band from about 14 with my "Rabbitt" buddies. We did a lot of playing around the country and in 1969 won the best band competition in South Africa. By 19 I was doing a lot of production and arrangements for records and had many hits in South Africa. In 1972 Neil, the “Rabbitt” drummer, was called up for army duty; at this time I spent a year with an anti apartheid band called "Freedoms Children". I was then called up to the army where I spent a year. After three months of basic training, I was transferred to the entertainment unit where I spent the rest of my time. After the army, Neil Cloud, Ronnie Robot and myself reformed “Rabbitt” . We had a great time and the band did well touring and selling multiplatinum albums.


Before you began you career in the rock genre, you scored a film in your country, South Africa, if I stand correct. Then you formed the group “Rabbitt”, working as soloist, where you delivered a very interesting album "Beginnings". Of course, you also collaborated during the 80´s with rock legends “Yes”. How was the transition from the world of Rock Music to scoring for film? What could you tell us about your experience with “Yes”?

During my time with "Rabbitt", I did my first film called "Death of a Snowman" ( I think it's now called "Soul Patrol")... It was a terrible film and not a great score. In 1978, I left South Africa for London to pursue a solo career. I recorded 3 albums for "Chrysalis Records" and worked with some great people. I was then signed by David Geffen in 1980 to write a new album of material. I moved to Los Angeles and spent 6 months writing the material that became "90125". Things didn't work out with Geffen and I found myself looking for a record deal. This is when I met Chris Squire and Alan White, and we decided to form a band, playing the material I had recently written. We liked the way it sounded and called the band "Cinema". We then got Tony Kaye in the band and recorded the album with Trevor Horn producing.. Near the end of the recording, Chris played Jon Anderson the material, he loved it; we invited him to sing on it. The record company knew they had a hit on their hands and thought we should call the band Yes. I was reluctant to do this but was outvoted.

After your time in "Yes", film music returned to your life. When did you decide to start a professional career in this industry? From what you told me, James Newton Howard was the one that encouraged you the most, into scoring for films, right?

After 14 years with “Yes” , I decided I wanted a change. I had studied orchestration, arrangement with professor Walter Mony in South Africa years before and missed working with orchestra. I decided I would pursue film scoring. It is true that James Newton Howard was very encouraging, and is a good friend.


With Mark Mancina you worked in one of your first scores. First, by playing the guitar in Twister and then by co-writing for the “Con Air” score. What could you tell us about Mark Mancina and your experience with him? What happened with the score of “Con Air” in the end?

In 1989 during time off with “Yes” I did a solo album called "Can´t Look Away". I toured on this album and a keyboard player was recommended to me by a friend. He owned a restaurant where Mark played. I hired Mark Mancina for this tour. This is how I met him. I later introduced him to Trevor Horn who was working with Hans Zimmer. In Twister, I only played a small amount of guitar as a favor to Mark. On "Con Air", Jerry Bruckheimer invited Mark and me to do the film. Unfortunately, soon after we started, Mancina had to leave to do "Speed 2", so I landed up doing "Con Air" alone.


In 1998, you scored "Armageddon" which was a rather great hit, at the time. Characterised by many as an Epic Symphonic Score, blend with a distinct Rock spirit and tone, by having the guitar on a basic and principal role. How did you become involved in that project and of course, is there something particular you remember off these sessions?

Although I had recently done "Con Air" for Jerry Bruckheimer, he was concerned that I didn't have enough experience to take on a film the size of "Armageddon". So I had to basically write the main themes before I was hired. I think Jerry had showed a lot of courage hiring someone with very little experience. Luckily, I had the themes by the time I started which made the project a little easier...but it was a gruelling project

Tell us about the score, your inspiration on writing the beautiful love theme and the dense action pieces. Which is your favourite sequence, both in the movie and score?

I was very happy with the main theme which I used for anthemic moments, romantic moments, and others. It is very rewarding when a theme is so easily adapted to different emotions.


In that film you worked with Harry Gregson Williams and also other composers from the Media Ventures studios. Later on, you also worked with Harry on “Enemy of the State”. Due to these facts, completed by a tight relationship with the studio, a lot of people thought that you were also part of the Media Ventures Studios. Please Trevor, tell us the real story behind this, the making process of “Armageddon” and “Enemy of the State”. You know, a lot of people still think you´re part of that team!

My studio is quite far from Jerry Bruckheimer´s offices, so after "Con Air" he requested that I find a studio nearer him to compose "Armageddon". Media Ventures was near Jerry , and had a great room available, so I hired the room for "Armageddon". There was a lot of music on the movie and I had great help from Harry Gregson-Williams, Paul Linford and Don Harper. I was in the middle of doing "Jack Frost" when Jerry Bruckheimer called me for "Enemy of the State". I was concerned about the two films overlapping so I asked Harry, and Tim Heinz to help. I wrote the themes before starting "Enemy of the State" which like "Armageddon", made it a little easier. I love what Harry did on "Enemy" and we shared credit. Hans Zimmer and I have been friends for a long time, however I have nothing to do with Media Ventures, I think they're a great company.


You worked with producer Jerry Bruckheimer in so many different films like "Kangaroo Jack", "Bad Company", "Gone on Sixty Seconds", "Remember the Titans" and recently on "Bad Boys II" and "National Treasure". How is it working with him? Was there creative freedom or did he set some specific musical paths for you to follow? A lot of people in the industry claim he´s a very tight man to work with.

There is no compromising or excepting second best with Jerry Bruckheimer. He is very demanding, and it's really hard work, but he's a great leader, absolutely believes in what he's doing, and treats me incredibly well.... and I think he is very talented.

In 1999, you worked in "Deep Blue Sea"; a dense action film, with one of your most inspiring scores, considered by many as one of your best efforts to date. The main theme is terrific, and the action music is powerful. What could you tell about that project? Did John Williams's Jaws play any kind of inspiration or reference for your work on this film?

On "Deep Blue Sea", the only influence that John Williams's "Jaws" had on me, was to make certain I don't go anywhere near it. I'm very proud of this score. It's always flattering when your work influences other people...in fact there was almost a lawsuit brought against "Shrek" by Warner Brothers for copyright infringement, due to the similarity of the "Shrek theme" to the "Deep Blue Sea theme".


"Remember the Titans" is another excellent score. The music here is completely orchestral, in a vivid contrast with your electronic-oriented scores for "The 6th Day", "Gone on Sixty Seconds" or "The One". What could you tell us about that score? Did you feel more comfortable writing for an orchestra instead composing an electronic score?

I write for what I think is best for the film. in the case of "Remember the Titans", an orchestral score seemed appropriate. Given the choice, I would say I love writing orchestral scores most. Jerry Bruckheimer told me recently that "Remember the Titans" is his most licensed score, which is very flattering.

Despite the fact that you were born in South Africa, you captured the American Spirit vert well, like in a particularly “Copland-ish”-like way in "American Outlaws" and "Texas Rangers". The first, one of your most appreciated scores by the fans, is a very dynamic one, with the guitars on a wild ride again. Tell us about those projects.


I do love Copland, so it's a complement that you hear that influence in "American Outlaws". For some time I had told my agents that I really would love to do a genuine western, so I really had amazing fun with "American Outlaws", and "Texas Rangers". I also wanted to integrate dobro with the orchestra, which was fun. My son played percussion on "American Outlaws" by the way. He's an incredible drummer.


Is it true that you offered to write the score for “Pirates of the Caribbean”? Why didn´t you finally score it? Did you hear the final score of Klaus Badelt & the Media Ventures Team? It was a criticised effort by many, but still quite fun. Many film music fans in addition, consider it to be a terrific score- albeit unoriginal- which however shows the true “rock” character of the film.

I wrote a demo for "Pirates of the Caribbean". It was a film I was thinking of doing and looking to do. I wrote the demo for it, thinking it was going to be a kid’s movie based on the ride, and so I wrote that and my imagination just led me in certain ways. Finally, I didn´t worked on it out schedule-wise, and actually I must be the only person who hasn't seen or heard "Pirates of the Caribbean". I was composing "Bad Boys 2" during "Pirates of th Caribbean".

That same year, Mark Mancina left "Bad Boys II" and you were called to score the film in his place. What happened with that score? How much time and space did you have on writing the music for it?

It was difficult when I was called to replace Mark Mancina on “Bad Boys 2”, as he's a friend. I didn't agree to do the film until it was clearly decided that Mark would not be continuing. I had a history with Michael Bay and Jerry Bruckheimer, so I knew what I was getting into.. It was a lot of work in a short time though.


"Exorcist: The Beginning" is another strange story with rejected scores, composers fired and all. What could you tell us about this experience? What is your opinion about the sad fact of score rejections, the firing of composers and all that appears to be a
rather frequent event in our days? Do you see it as something normal, a natural risk that every film composer has to take or as a harming and unnatural procedure? Have you experienced anything similar in your career so far?

I'm happy to say that I have not been fired off a film. The score is usually the last thing to be done. So a lot lands on the scores shoulders. A lot of problems that seem to have nothing to do with the music gets blamed on the music , because it's relatively cheap to change, where as a reshoot etc is not. Music is often expected to help or fix bad cuts, bad acting, bad filming, bad timing, you name it. It often works, but if it doesn't, music is sometimes blamed. I also think temp scores are a big culprit.. Directors get locked in and it's often difficult to get them to focus on different music. Consequently composers are sometimes fired or worse, land up basically writing a version of the temp.. It's a problem. With regard to the "Exorcist: The Beginning", Chris Young had been hired to do the film, but then Renny Harlin was brought in as director and hired me. I had worked for Renny before on "Deep Blue Sea" and I love him. I really enjoyed doing "Exorcist: The Beginning".


"The Great Raid" is your latest work. Varese Sarabande recently released the score which is characterized by many as a great step away from your “typical” style, as it´s essentially a great work for orchestra and choir. How did you become involved in that film? Why did you decided that the orchestral approach was the most suiting for the movie?

"The Great Raid" was very difficult to "get". I had to once again write a theme to show where I thought it should go. But I must confess , that for me, this is my best work so far. It was the first time I had worked orchestraly in London and it was fantastic. I really worked hard on the themes and the orchestrations and was very happy at the end. I also think the dub engineer was great.

What could you tell about the film? How was working with John Dahl?

Working with John Dahl was inspirational. He was very closely involved , but he was more a great coach encouraging me than trying to change things. I would work with him again anytime.

The Main theme is memorable, but there a lot of complex and inspiring, long action cues, particularly for "The Rescue" sequence... What are your thoughts on this score? What is your favourite cue?

I think my favorite cue to listen to is the first track "The Rescue". I think the main words used in discussions between John Dahl and myself was humility and dignity.


This year you also scored "Coach Carter", a sport film like "Remember the Titans", and also there are news about a film, "Ripley Under Ground", where you repeat the collaboration with director Roger Spottiswoode. What could you tell us about those two projects?

"Coach Carter" was fun to do and I liked working with Thomas Carter the director. Roger Spottiswoode and I really wanted to work together on "Ripley Under Ground", unfortunetly time got in the way. But we will definitely work together at some point.

Is there a particular movie/score genre where you feel you´re the most comfortable working at? Which ones work the best for you?

This will sound like a cop out , but I really love working with picture in gereral. It can be a good movie ("Any Gentre"), a sports theme ( I did the themes for the NBA-Basketball, Nascar theme, Baseball theme), a tv theme, (just finished "Ering"),or a theme park ride ("Epcot-mission space"). I don't have a desire to do is a weekly tv show however.

Also, we would love to know some stuff about your personal preferences. What kind of music do you usually listen to? Which film composers (living or demised) have an influence on your work?

My musical taste covers a huge range. I love great blue grass, bulgarian female state choir, Arnold Schoenberg, Aaron Copland, Tchaikovsky, Ennio Morricone ("The Mission"), Foo Fighters... too much to mention.


In conclusion, what could you tell us about your future works? We heard that you will work in "Glory Days" produced by Jerry Bruckheimer. Any other films you will be involved in? What would be your dream project? Perhaps an animated film, some would say!

I am doing "Glory Road" right now, and then I will start "Gridiron Gang" with The Rock. I also hope to do a solo album soon.
And yes, I would like to do an animated film at some point soon. I think it would be very enjoyable.




English Edition: Demetris Christodoulides

Traducción: Pablo Nieto


Author: Pablo Nieto


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