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Yeah, 30-ish seconds into Do You Bleed?"Reminiscent Therapy" is amazing in the way it incorporates a lot of Williams' classic stuff making it feel very natural and organic, like it's part Powell's themes, like he does with "The Adentures of Han".<br><br>This is a really great scoreHe is the chosen one, the one who will bring balance to the film music world...Thats just 'do you bleed?' with a small insert?Haha, It's as the prophecy foretold.
John Powell, the great uniter of film music fans@MrZimmerFan<br><br>I actually like Rogue One, and I do understand why it leans so heavily on the original themes. Here the themes are incorporated more as fan service, but Powell is able to do wonders with interpolating them with his material. <br><br>And something I forgot to mention, this score reminds me so much of Pan in the action sequences. The percussion and brass writing is great lolim surprised how Powell uses his ANTZ percussion in this!<br><br>The track Train Heist, Into The Maw is good example of it.<br><br>This is the only score that will please the gang at JW and HZ alike.When JWFan and HZ.com are discussing the same score....'but not as heavily as Rogue One'<br><br>Because Rogue One have conections with certain aspects or characters from the OT?<br><br>An here you have a track with three themes (or cues) with no conections with the OT, Rogue One have more sense... but the score is fricking awesome :)
So first impressions:<br><br>JP knocked this one out of the park! The whole score has this excellent swashbuckling vibe, which is surprisingly aggressive during the action sequences (entirely due to his trademark percussion).<br><br>The writing style is really interesting, it’s basically John Powell doing his usual style but with some Williams flourishes, especially during the softer cues. The Star Wars themes do return, but not as heavily as Rogue One. And of course the JW cue is great, although surprisingly structured more as an action cue as opposed to a concert suite.<br><br>And for some reason the Han theme sounds vaguely similar to Poe’s theme from Force Awakens.Let’s just say “Reminiscience Therapy”.... hold onto your seats! ;-)This score is awesome!! Powell did a great job at making a score that's differet than all the other SW scores, but still you know it's a SW score. He reprised Williams' theme brilliantly and I can't stop to listen to it!!!what about the music when batman makes it back to the cave and lex opens the case of kryptonite. cant find it in theseYeah I can't agree that Inception or Interstellar are superior pieces of scoring. Certainly not in structure, thematic development, etc. <br><br>What defined those scores is the vision behind them more so than the execution. In so many ways, that is opposite of The World's End. Interstellar is a brilliant score that managed to provide each scene with a simplistic tone, but one that captured the atmosphere behind the scenes perfectly, such as the unique use of the organ. Same with Inception with the guitars. <br><br>With a World's End, the vision is nothing special. It is a rock and roll twist to classic music. But the execution brings enormous power and gravitas to the movie.<br><br>I would sum it up by saying that in Interstellar and Inception, the creation of the music drives the movie's ideas while in At World's End, the movie drives the creation of the music.
Nazg&#251;l for Azog I will never forgive. It's not a Servant of Sauron theme, it's a Ringwraith theme, and Azog's not a Ringwraith, he's a goddam Orc, and that theme doesn't belong there, full stop. It was just put there because it sounds "epic" and would "pump up the action scene". Gondor Restored at the end is just as stupid. And the Dreaming of Bag End theme for Bilbo is indeed lovely, and would have been lovelier still if it actually appeared in the movie. Instead it just gets replaced by copy/pasted Hobbit music from LOTR instead because Peter Jackson desperately wants his audience to remember how good those movies were in lieu of the Hobbit ones being any good on their own. Needless to say it goes missing entirely from the second and third score...along with the Misty Mountains melody (the strongest theme of the first one). I still really like those scores overall but they got absolutely butchered in terms of their thematic usage in the films. Then again those movies were an absolute clusterfuck so I shouldn't be surprised.<br><br>WRT Harry Potter, the 3 note theme does work okay for Voldemort, except that there's already a longer, separate Voldemort theme in Philosopher's, one that I like even more, and which only gets used once in Chamber (when Riddle rearranges the letters). I can understand liking Chamber better than Philosopher when you compare the albums, but in terms of the complete scores there's no contest at all, Philosopher wins by a country mile because of Chamber's rehash issues (and there are some good cues missing from the album, such as the Troll and Forbidden Forest scenes).@Edmund<br>The thing with the Nolan scores (at least Interstellar/Inception) is that they are repetitive, in as much as being built heavily around the suites that I’m guessing they use to edit and temp the film. <br>And while the themes are simple I do think they are structured in a unique enough way which builds emotional resonance through the gradual increase in chords/volume/speed/etc. Even Dunkirk is a relatively simple score theme wise, but is so technically complex.<br><br>And personally I’ve never been in love with Inception. I admire it on a technical level, but outside of “Time” I find it to be a fairly cold score. Obviously what it was meant to do so not a complaint, more of a personal preference thing.You know, I actually like Chamber of Secrets much more than Philosopher's Stone. It has the best moments from that score with improved themes. (I actually like the 3 note motif for Voldemort better than it being used for the stone, it already sounded like the Sith theme from Star Wars so might as well go all the way with it.) It felt more tight, better paced, and had an overall more energetic feel to it.<br><br>The Hobbit, I'm not entirely sure where you're getting heartbreaking from. If you mean the state of its release I absolutely agree, if you're talking about its reprisals the only one I had any issue with was the Return of the King/Gondor Restored theme which had nothing to do with Thorin and Bilbo's relationship. <br><br>The Nazghul theme being used for Azog I thought was fine as he was a servant of Sauron in the movies, History of the Ring and Gollum's themes were used effectively, and the new thematic material for the first film, I thought was wonderful. The themes A Baggins of Bag-End and The Lonely Mountain song being used as a Fellowship type of theme are the greatest highlights for me.See, I don't find Inception or Interstellar (or Thin Red Line) all that "complex". Especially not compared to At World's End (how many themes are in that score, like 15? 20? Pretty much all of which show up in rapid succession during the Maelstrom battle?). The Nolan scores are more about building up around very simple conceptual ideas.<br><br>Unless you're talking about emotional complexity, which is a very different thing and not really possible to objectively judge...You know, I don't think I've ever really gotten the full story surrounding that score. I've heard conflicting reports. My personal belief is that Ross did little to no substantial composition and that all the new stuff (themes, suites, new cues and also significantly fresh arrangements of old material) is pure Williams, but that film is full of reused music from the first film (it's actually quite frustrating, not as bad as On Stranger Tides or as heartbreaking as The Hobbit, but a bit of a rehashy mess and it makes the key error of using the Philosopher's Stone motif as a Voldemort theme). That's where I think Ross comes in and was responsible for taking those cues verbatim from the first film and tweaking/rearranging them just enough to match the timings of the scenes without actually adding any of his "own" notes. His role is likely somewhere between additional music, arrangement and music editing (but as Hybrid likes to point out, oftentimes those sorts of roles are really blurred and overlapping anyways).<br><br>A guy at jwfan did an analysis that helps understand the nature of that score, but be warned, it goes *really* deep:<br><br>www.jwfan.com/forums/index.php?/topic/27619-finished-chamber -of-secrets-thematic-and-originality-analysis/
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 LATEST RELEASES
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  2007, February 27
Silva Screen to release a new Zimmer compilation

Silva Screen Records plans to release a new Hans Zimmer compilation album which will be conducted by James Fitzpatrick and will contain new arrangements on Zimmer famous themes such as "Pirates of the Caribbean", "The Rock", "Driving Miss Daisy", "The Thin Red Line", "Crimson Tide" and "The Da Vinci code".

The news come from tadlowmusic.com


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  2007, February 26
The 79th Academy Award Winners

Gustavo Santaolalla won the Best Original Score Academy Award for his work on Babel. Congratulations to Gustavo as this is his second win after having won for "Brokeback Mountain" last year. The other nominees for the same category this year were Alexandre Desplat with "The Queen", Javier Navarrete with "Pan's Labyrinth", Philip Glass with "Notes on a Scandal", and Thomas Newman for "The Good German".

The Oscar for Best Song went to Melissa Etheridge for "I Need to Wake Up" from An Inconvenient Truth.

Check out the complete winners' list at: oscars.com


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  2007, February 25
IMFCA Awards for 2006 announced

For Immediate Release

JAMES NEWTON HOWARD'S "LADY IN THE WATER" RECEIVES 2006 BEST SCORE HONORS FROM THE INTERNATIONAL FILM MUSIC CRITICS ASSOCIATION

February 23, 2007. The members of the International Film Music Critics Association (IFMCA) have announced the winners of the 3rd Annual IFMCA Awards, honoring achievements in film and television music in 2006.

Hans Zimmer, who led the 2006 nominations with six nods, wins two awards: Best Original Score for an Action Film for Ron Howard's "The DaVinci Code" (Decca Records) and for Best Original Score for a Comedy Film for Nancy Meyers' "The Holiday" (Varese Sarabande), which coincidentally includes a main character played by Jack Black who is a film composer.

The Best Original Score in an Animated Film goes to John Powell's score to the tap-dancing penguin hit, "Happy Feet," directed by George Miller (Atlantic Records).

The complete list:

FILM SCORE OF THE YEAR
Lady in the Water (James Newton Howard)

FILM COMPOSER OF THE YEAR
Alexandre Desplat

BEST NEW COMPOSER OF 2006
Brett Rosenberg (Half Light)

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR A DRAMA FILM
The Black Dahlia (Mark Isham)

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR A COMEDY FILM
The Holiday (Hans Zimmer)

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR AN ANIMATED FILM
Happy Feet (John Powell)

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR AN ACTION/THRILLER FILM
The Da Vinci Code (Hans Zimmer)

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR A FANTASY/SCIENCE FICTION/HORROR FILM
Lady in the Water (James Newton Howard)

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR TELEVISION
Planet Earth (George Fenton)

BEST SINGLE CUE OF 2006
"The Great Eatlon" from Lady in the Water (James Newton Howard)

FILM MUSIC RECORD LABEL OF THE YEAR
Intrada (Douglass Fake, producer)

For more info, the full press release, IFMCA awards' history, complete members' list and even more, please visit filmmusiccritics.org


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  2007, February 25
Trevor Morris to score HILL HAVE EYES 2

The sequel to the 2006 horror movie "The Hill Have Eyes" which received a score by TomandDandy, will be entitled "Hill have eyes 2" and according to the the Gorfaine-Schwartz Agency and filmmusicweekly.com it will be scored by composer Trevor Morris.

Wes Craven, Peter Locke and Marianne Maddalena produced while Martin Weisz is the director.


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  2007, February 05
John Powell to attend Úbeda

7 times ASCAP award winner and 2007 BAFTA nominee John Powell has further announced his intention to attend this year’s International Film Music Conference – City of Úbeda.

Born in London in 1968, John Powell is best known for his outstanding scores to some of the biggest Hollywood box office hits in the last decade. His scores for films like Shrek, Antz and Chicken Run are nowadays a unique point of reference in the animation genre as is the case with his music for action flicks such as The Bourne Identity, The Bourne Supremacy and X-Men: The Last Stand.

John Powell is currently involved in yet another Jason Bourne movie (The Bourne Ultimatum) as well as in Jimmy Hayward’s adaptation of a Dr. Seuss book Horton Hears a Who.

This years guests include :

JOHN POWELL
JOHN DEBNEY
DAVID ARNOLD
PASCAL GAIGNE
JAVIER NAVARRETE
and more names to be added soon!

Source : congreso.bsospirit.com


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  2007, February 04
The Number 23
Harry Gregson-Williams




  2007, February 03
James Dooley scores new videogames

Composer James Dooley has a couple of exciting new projects in his agenda, namely the upcoming Xbox360 game Def Jam: Icon by Cinematics and Castle Wolfenstein by Activision.

For more info you can visit James Dooley's official website and the Gorfaine-Schwartz Agency.


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  2007, February 03
Harry Gregson-Williams, at the bright nexus between sound and picture, manages to make musical magic for a life on and off the silver screen that sounds like it should: GREAT

Read the full interview at: http://www.eqmag.com/story.asp?storyCode=13266


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  2007, February 02
INTERNATIONAL FILM MUSIC CRITICS ASSOCIATION ANNOUNCES ITS NOMINEES FOR THE BEST FILM SCORES OF 2006

2 February 2007. The members of the International Film Music Critics Association (IFMCA) have announced their nominees for the 3rd IFMCA Awards, honoring achievements in film and television music in 2006.
The nominees are:

FILM SCORE OF THE YEAR
- The Black Dahlia (Mark Isham)
- The Da Vinci Code (Hans Zimmer)
- The Fountain (Clint Mansell)
- Lady in the Water (James Newton Howard)
- Perfume: The Story of a Murderer (Tom Tykwer, Reinhold Heil and Johnny Klimek)
- X-Men: The Last Stand (John Powell)

FILM COMPOSER OF THE YEAR
- Alexandre Desplat
- James Newton Howard
- Mark Isham
- John Powell
- Hans Zimmer

BEST NEW COMPOSER OF 2006
- Caine Davidson (An American Haunting)
- Nicholas Dodd (Renaissance)
- Mark Orton (Sweet Land)
- Douglas Pipes (Monster House)
- Brett Rosenberg (Half Light)

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR A DRAMA FILM
- The Black Dahlia (Mark Isham)
- The Departed (Howard Shore)
- The Good German (Thomas Newman)
- The Nativity Story (Mychael Danna)
- The Painted Veil (Alexandre Desplat)
- The Queen (Alexandre Desplat)

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR A COMEDY FILM
- The Holiday (Hans Zimmer)
- Little Miss Sunshine (Mychael Danna)
- Miss Potter (Nigel Westlake and Rachel Portman)
- The Pink Panther (Christophe Beck)
- The Shaggy Dog (Alan Menken)

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR AN ANIMATED FILM
- Cars (Randy Newman)
- Charlotte's Web (Danny Elfman)
- The Ant Bully (John Debney)
- Happy Feet (John Powell)
- Ice Age: The Meltdown (John Powell)

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR AN ACTION/THRILLER FILM
- Casino Royale (David Arnold)
- The Da Vinci Code (Hans Zimmer)
- Firewall (Alexandre Desplat)
- Mission: Impossible III (Michael Giacchino)
- Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest (Hans Zimmer)

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR A FANTASY/SCIENCE FICTION/HORROR FILM
- Eragon (Patrick Doyle)
- The Fountain (Clint Mansell)
- Lady in the Water (James Newton Howard)
- Superman Returns (John Ottman)
- X-Men: The Last Stand (John Powell)

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR TELEVISION
- 24 Season 5 (Sean Callery)
- Battlestar Galactica Season 2/3 (Bear McCreary)
- Lost Season 2/3 (Michael Giacchino)
- Planet Earth (George Fenton)
- The Ten Commandments (Randy Edelman)

BEST SINGLE CUE OF 2006
- "Evey Reborn" from V for Vendetta (Dario Marianelli)
- "The Great Eatlon" from Lady in the Water (James Newton Howard)
- "Chevaliers de Sangreal" from The Da Vinci Code (Hans Zimmer)
- "Eragon" from Eragon (Patrick Doyle)

FILM MUSIC RECORD LABEL OF THE YEAR
- Film Score Monthly (Lukas Kendall, producer)
- Intrada (Douglass Fake, producer)
- La-La Land (MV Gerhard and Matt Verboys, producers)
- MovieScore Media (Mikael Carlsson, producer)
- Varese Sarabande (Robert Townson, producer)

Source : www.soundtrack.net


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