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Hello everybody,<br><br>does anybody know if the cd is released?<br>Can't find a website with further information...<br>Do you know where to buy the album?<br><br>Thanks!Hans Zimmer can credit anyone whom he thinks has helped him out on the score.Eagle Rock just replied to my email. Apparently coming later this year, but no actual date yetI always like hearing a score first before I go in. Especially with a film like this. When I haven't heard the score first I pay too much attention to the music so I can take everything in but then I stop using attention to the movie itself. But in case with Dunkirk the movie comes out few day before the score gets released in my country.Yeah, I don't think I can help it, but I really want to watch the movie first before listening to the score.<br><br>With Interstellar, it was a magical experience, especially when Cornfield Chase was playing and No Time for Caution melding perfectly with the docking scene.
I'll never forget how thrilling it was when I watched Interstellar, once the cd was released after the movie, because Hans and Nolan wanted us to feel the images and sound together. I'll do the same with Dunkirk and all further movies with these amazing director and composer.Yes haha I Know this one and it is just sad because the People that Listen to this Kind of Music like us Are often very passionate about it and to make Profit this way is really Not fair and it is really the Most confusing thing that happend to me when it comes to this Music buisness. For Sure Crimson Tide and TF4 Are Not available as well but this TF3 Score is Giant ! For me in the Same Level as Inception if You Look at it as a wholeand not just Time .Look at this what happens! Because of this strategy the score is available at certain dealers for 621 Pound sterling! It seems that the CD was in sale too. Unbelievable<br><br>https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B004XKR6NC/ref=olp_product_detai ls?_encoding=UTF8&me=Look at this what happens! Because of this strategy the score is available at certain dealers for 621 Pound sterling! It seems that the CD was in sale too. Unbelievable<br><br>https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B004XKR6NC/ref=olp_product_detai ls?_encoding=UTF8&me=Did Mr. Jablonsky write that beautiful piano melody in Hunted? Or was it Hans?
25 minutes :O Where's all of that? They didn't use that in the movie. Don't understand why so many songs were in the movie :( Will there be an expanded release?There's 25 actually lol...<br><br>And Hans just added a few notes here & there to the themes... ;)Hybrid, what "Additional music" did Hans do for this? There is hardly 7 minutes of score in this movie.There were little homages in Dark of the Moon with tracks like Communicating With Nest, but no the Autobot theme was very much distanced from at that point. Though there were many reprises of Optimus in Dark of the Moon. Also they play the 3 note escalation of Autobots in Did You Forget Who I Am.There are definitely similarities. Easy to spot. "Two Moons" (from 0:57), "We Were Gods Once" (from 0:26).
Is it me or the track "Two Moons" borrows some elements from "We Were Gods Onece" Dark of the Moon?Does anyone notice the Barbossa/Beckett theme from On Stranger Tides at 1:52 in "Shansa"?Musical Gold ! Perfect term for this . Still no suite examples ?That cue is Mazzaro !Oh, theme is Brandenburg Concerto no. 3, no Branderbourg Concerto no. 3.
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 LATEST RELEASES
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  2013, September 27updated by Antas 
Hans Zimmer plays the piano of the future



Hans Zimmer, the creative force behind some of Hollywood's best loved film music, including the Oscar-winning Lion King score, adjusts his chair in front of a sleek black instrument that looks something like the control panel of a stealth bomber.

He raises his hands to the monochrome keyboard and presses gently. A familiar strain emerges from it: the opening lines of the Dark Knight theme, but today it sounds unlike it has ever sounded before.

More here : http://edition.cnn.com/2013/09/27/tech/innovation/hans-zimmer-seaboard-future-piano/index.html


Comments (37)

  2013, September 23updated by Hybrid Soldier 
HANS ZIMMER by HANS ZIMMER


"I didn't start in Germany. I could never get a job there since I hadn't gone to music school, and they wanted to see references from an Akademie.

I was playing in bands in England - pups, colleges, workingmen's clubs, strip-joints. Always late with the rent, and worse - always ran out of shillings for the electricity meter. Makes it a bit hard on the electronic wunderwerk when it all gets dark in the middle of a riff.

Lived mainly off the kindness of friends (it is important, as a musician, to be entertaining enough that people take you out on a regular basis for expensive dinners). Always owed the bank money - but the bank manager sort of believed in me, and let me overdraw. Borrowed synth from the good people at Argent's Keyboards and Syco Systems. Fell in with the jingle crowd, which was a regular check (I used to do two or three a week, sometimes as a composer, sometimes as a synth programmer for other composers)

Started working with an equally poor Trevor Horn and Geoff Downes. Made a song we couldn't give away. Went to number one the week before my twenty-first birthday. Still waiting for the royalties.

Got fed up with the world of rock 'n' roll. Started working with Stanley Myers (The Deer Hunter) as his assistant. He showed me how the orchestra worked, I made excellent espresso. Fair deal.

It was actually quite good not to be on the road anymore. I used every second to get better with equipment. I would loiter at the studio after I was done with my session and learn from engineers like Geoff Emerick, Flood, Hugh Padgham (actually, he was the bass player in my first band).

Built a studio in London with Stanley. It was tiny, but sounded great. Soul To Soul, a lot of KLF and other experimental stuff, endless disco... Learned what a "hook" is. Beethoven knew... Mozart and the Stones knew...

And the commercial directors where starting to make TV movies. Our friends Tim Bevan and Sarah Radcliffe started a film company called "Working Title". No money, but a vision. Suddenly we where doing movies. Our movies where edgy and funny and usually under-financed before we even started. Mostly cut above strip joints or brothels in London's Soho. It was all just a different form of the world of entertainment, and the rent was cheap. Still owed the bank a fortune. I kept telling them that a synth could buy a house, not the other way round. That One idea, One tune would make the difference between ruin and being able to pay the banks back. And since I had no other qualifications, they didn't really have a choice.

But I knew my stuff. It was limited - I was into electronica - but I could go up to any synth, any mixing console and work with it. I never took a day off. I was glued to all the synthporn magazines, hung out for years at Syco systems, who sold the Fairlight and the Linn, and eventually was offered a movie in L.A.

And while we - due to lack of money - had really made what little technology we had (ok, I had a Fairlight by then... don't ask how we got it or paid for it. Sometimes you have to be lucky. Thank You, Stanley Kubrick!) work for us brilliantly, Hollywood wasn't at all the technological fab place I imagined it to be. It was very talented people writing on paper, with their arrangers and orchestrators in some dingy back room with neon lighting and cottage cheese ceilings. Not really my thing. Stained, cracked linoleum floors and water-damaged ceilings ("but that's where Orson Welles cut 'Citizen Kane'!", yeah, great, but can you at least change the lightbulb?") So I built myself another studio and other people wanted to be part of it, like Mark Mancina, Harry G-W, John Powell... and because we had all that rather cool, yet primitive technology, directors actually liked coming over and hearing mock-ups of a score, discuss the music to picture without a hundred piece orchestra waiting outside. And we had an excellent drinks cupboard.

But the main thing was - we all had an insane work ethic (I remember feeling guilty leaving at 4am one morning, because everybody else's car was still there.). We surrounded ourselves with the greatest music editors like Adam Smalley and Bob Badami (look up their credits!) and changed their way of working to be more like record producers. We got recording engineers like Alan Meyerson, who could effortlessly move between orchestra and fuzz-box.

If we had an idea, we'd build it. We still build our own samplers, put unfair pressure onto companies like Steinberg and Avid (Logic is too corporate now. It's not how long it took to get this last update. When do you think the next one is coming out?)

We very much worked like a firm of architects. One main designer, with us all helping each other out. People are still confused about the "additional music" credits. If it sounds like me, it's probably me. Head Architect. But how can my collaborators ever get a career going if they are just "Ghosts"? If it sounds like John Powell, it's probably him... same rules apply.

Personally, I couldn't give a flying f@&$ about credits. I'm in it for the process. That's the part I love. I have a deal with one film company where they pay me next to nothing for the music, but a shitload of money for doing press. Press is hard work, parties scare the living day lights out of me, and premieres are only great for being in amongst a big audience for whom, ultimately we made it, and enjoying the movie with them. The party after is just some sort of Irish wake, where we say good bye to the joy we had making the thing.

The only thing between you and a career is singleminded stubbornness, hard work and sweat, tempered with social graces and a true compassion for your poor director, good ideas, recklessness, humility and an insane work ethic. You have to have talent in all of these fields, plus, obviously, music and story telling. You need to be a proud servant of the film, and be respectful and a little bit in love with and of your audience. I'm not big on awards. They usually get it wrong. "Shawshank Redemption" should have won the Oscar, in my opinion. My learned and generous peers obviously had a different opinion and gave it to me for "Lion King". Made no difference to my career, or the trajectory I was on.

The only true compliment I feel is, when someone goes out and spends their hard earned money on one of my movies or soundtrack. Real people, who have a choice, wanting to be entertained and moved and think I can do that. The only thing I'm interested in is that I'm having some weird ongoing dialogue through my music with people I've never met, who are moved or provoked by my music, that something from my heart resonates with their emotion or brain - all over the world, whatever culture. And I'm interested that some guy with no education from Frankfurt can make it in Hollywood. Because that means anybody can."

Hans Zimmer (from VI Control)


Comments (17)

  2013, September 22updated by Nicolas 
NEW Hans ZIMMER's INTERVIEW

Hans Zimmer is talking on his Rush Soundtrack, Oscar Nominations & 'Man Of Steel 2'

Read more at the Huffingtonpost.com


Comments (0)

  2013, September 13updated by Hybrid Soldier 
Hans Zimmer Interview about RUSH





Comments (3)

  2013, September 12updated by Antas 


Comments (18)

  2013, September 08updated by Nicolas 
The Legend Of Shalimar

Have a look on the new TV spot from Guerlain
featuring music from The Da Vinci Code (2006) (By Hans)



A film by Bruno Aveillan
With Natalia Vodianova & Willy Cartier
France
Release date : 2013/08/28


Comments (1)

  2013, September 07updated by Nicolas 
Listen To Some Tracks From Rush Soundtrack HERE



  2013, September 04updated by Nicolas 
Batman vs. Superman



‘Batman vs. Superman’
Hans Zimmer On Whether He’ll Score the ‘Man of Steel’ Sequel


Hans Zimmer’s drum-tastic score for Man of Steel ranks among his most impressive work in recent memory, but there’s been some doubt surrounding his potential return to provide the music for the Man of Steel sequel – not least of all, because the movie will include Batman, who’s a comic book character that Zimmer previously helped bring to life when he scored director .

Read more HERE


Comments (15)

  2013, September 03updated by Hybrid Soldier 
Hans Zimmer Interview at RUSH Premiere





Comments (18)


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